1.22.2012

Salvation, California-style

(http://gearjunkie.com/images/3902.jpg)


You're dead. Practically anyway. You're floundering on the floor of Death Valley, and it's merely a matter of time until the buzzards move in.

Good news: Jesus is there. He's come down into Death Valley, and He asks you if you want to live. When you say yes, He takes your hand. At that instant, you're saved. You've crossed over from Death to Life.

But Jesus doesn't stay still for long. He lives on top of Mt. Whitney, and He wants to take you with Him. But that entails movement--a constant stream of choices. "Will I keep holding His hand here?" "What about here?" "I'm tired; it's hot; I'd rather go the other way."

Salvation is simply a matter of clasping the hand of Jesus and choosing to keep holding on.

Ever Upward

6 comments:

  1. I like this thought. Thank you. :)

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  2. A good lesson, but I'm afraid I consider the earthly race a pretty stupid race when the people in it cause themselves permanent medical harm. Then again it makes your point even more because the Christian's race is extreme.

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  3. I enjoyed this as well... :) You hit the nail on the head-- "and choosing to keep holding on."

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  4. Good word! I am so glad, that even when I let go, He never lets go of me! Blessings!

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  5. I wrote this as a way of articulating my view in contrast to a few ideas with which I am frequently confronted. One is the notion that once we accept Jesus, we're home free, nothing can prevent us from being saved. Another is the related idea that being a Christian is easy, because Jesus does all the work. The opposite, but no less dangerous fallacy is thinking that I can do anything on my own to save myself.

    I think it's critically important that we chart a path between these shoals or else risk a debilitating shipwreck of our faith. This is my (admittedly simplistic) effort to explain what I believe in this regard.

    (And Dorinda, I tend to think that participating in the Badwater is probably less morally culpable than many other risks humans take of causing themselves permanent medical harm, although I will admit, it is pretty crazy! :)

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